2/20/2018

MoneyMatters101.com Home
Information about Jewelry

Amber
Amethyst
Aquamarine
Birthstones
Bloodstone
Citrine
Colored Diamonds
Colors of Coral
Coral Jewelry
Cultured Pearls
Diamonds
Diamond Cuts and Grades
Diamond Jewelry
Emeralds
Garnet
Garnet Grouping
Gemstone Cuts
Gemstone Cutters
Gemstones
Gold
Gold Jewelry
How Pearls Form
Ivory
Ivory Carvings
Jade
Jade Carving
Jasper
Jewelry
Men and Jewelry
Moonstone
Natural Pearls
Opal
Organic Gemstones
Pearls
Peridot
Petrified Wood
Quartz
Rubies
Sapphire
Topaz
Tourmaline
Turquoise

Links

Email Us

Antiques/Collectibles
Planning A Wedding
Start A Wardrobe

VA Home Loans
Managing Money

MoneyMatters101



 

Ivory

Ivory is the smooth, hard, dentin substance that is what elephant tusks, walrus tusks, narwhals, hippopotamus teeth, and some plants are made of.

Organic in nature, Ivory is basically white in color, but can be found in creamy or slightly off white. In Siberia, the USSR, small amounts of ivory from fossilized mammoths can be found in a blue hue called ondontolite.

Ivory is one of the most sought after materials for use in making jewelry, ornamental figurines, and other adornments because it is truly beautiful.

Ivory is known to have been used by the earliest know human beings. Carved ivory jewelry and other figurines have been found in tombs dating back to the stone age.

For centuries, ivory has been bought, sold, and traded all over the world, making it a highly prized commodity.

Early Africans bought, sold, and traded ivory, and it is known to have been used in ancient times in Egypt, the Middle East, Europe, and Asia.

The Chinese have become the most prolific carvers of ivory, making fine ivory jewelry, chess pieces, chop sticks, and ivory balls.

Because of the declining numbers of elephants and other animals that have been slaughtered for their tusks, the market for ivory has all but gone underground.

Many countries band the importation of ivory and others have passed strict laws against the killing of elephants.

Ivory has become a rare commodity and so collectors, museums, and ordinary individuals are buying it as fast as it can be found, causing the price for ivory to increase drastically.

Book of the Month

Book about investing

Advertise on MoneyMatters101.com

 

Share


Accessibility Policy| Terms Of Use| Privacy Policy| Advertise with Us| Contact Us

Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the Terms of Use.

We are looking to create more mutually beneficial partnerships. If you are interested in partnering with MoneyMatters101.com, send us your proposal.

MoneyMatters101.com™

Link to MoneyMatters101.com