8/19/2017

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Information about the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

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Are You Prepared?
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Biological Terrorism
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Consider Your Pets
Emergency Kit
Emergency Money
Family Communication Plan
Fire Safety
If You Have To Evacuate
Important Documents
Information Management
Get Involved
Make A Plan
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Stay Or Go
The Elderly and Disabled
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Medicines And Medical Supplies

The reality of a disaster situation is that you will likely not have access to everyday conveniences. To plan in advance, think through the details of your everyday life.

The first step is to consider how an emergency might affect your individual needs. Plan to make it on your own, for at least three days. It's possible that you will not have access to a medical facility or even a drugstore. It is crucial that you and your family think about what kinds of resources you use on a daily basis and what you might do if those resources are limited or not available.

Medications and Medical Supplies: If you take medicine or use a medical treatment on a daily basis, be sure you have what you need on hand to make it on your own for at least a week. You should also keep a copy of your prescriptions as well as dosage or treatment in formation. If it is not possible to have a week-long supply of medicines and supplies, keep as much as possible on hand and talk to your pharmacist or doctor about what else you should do to prepare.

If you undergo routine treatments administered by a clinic or hospital or if you receive regular services such as home health care, treatment or transportation, talk to your service provider about their emergency plans. Work with them to identify back-up service providers within your area and the areas you might evacuate to. If you use medical equipment in your home that requires electricity to operate, talk to your health care provider about what you can do to prepare for its use during a power outage.

In addition, there may be other things specific to your personal needs that you should also have on hand.

(1) Copies of medical prescriptions, doctors' orders, and the style and serial numbers of the assistive devices you use.

(2) At least a week's supply of any medication or medical supplies you use regularly, or as much as you can keep on hand.

(3) Medical alert tags or bracelets or written descriptions of your disability and support needs, in case you are unable to describe the situation in an emergency.

(4) Medical insurance cards, Medicare/Medicaid cards, physician contact information, list of your allergies and health history

(5) A list of the local non-profit or community based organizations that know you or assist people with access and functional needs similar to yours.

(6) Extra eyeglasses; backup supplies for any visual aids you use.

(7) Extra batteries for hearing aids; extra hearing aids if you have them (or if you have insurance coverage for them).

(8) Battery chargers for motorized wheelchairs, or other battery-opperated medical/assistive technology devices

(9) Supplies for your service animal. You can find more tips at http://www.ready.gov/animals.

(10) A laminated personal communication board, if you might need assistance with being understood or understanding others.

(11) If you use a motorized wheelchair, have a light weight manual chair available for emergencies. Know the size and weight of your wheelchair, in addition to whether or not it is collapsible, in case it has to be transported.

(12) If you have allergies or chemical sensitivities, be sure to include items that you are able to use for personal hygiene and for cleanup.

If you use eyeglasses, hearing aids and hearing aid batteries, wheelchair batteries, and oxygen, be sure you always have extras in your home. Also have copies of your medical insurance, Medicare and Medicaid cards readily available.

Also be sure you have cash or travelers checks in your kits in case you need to purchase supplies.

Listed below are talking points developed by FEMA that will help you in making you and your family as prepared as possible if there is a disaster in the area in which you live.

(1) Are you prepared?

(2) Be informed

(3) Chemical and biological terrorism

(4) Chemical and biological weapons

(5) Consider your pets

(6) Create a personal support network

(7) Develop a family communication plan

(8) Emergency Information Management

(9) Emergency kit

(10) Emergency money

(11) Fire safety

(12) Get involved

(13) If you have to evacuate

(14) Important documents

(15) Make a plan

(16) Medical supplies

(17) Shelter-in-place

(18) Stay or go

(19) The elderly and the disabled

(20) Vehicle emergency kit

(21) Working together

Preparing Makes Sense. Get Ready Now.

Information was developed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in consultation with AARP, the American Red Cross and the National Organization on Disability.

 

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